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Bryn Mawr College to Award 2015 Katharine Hepburn Medal to Supreme Court ...

Photo Credit: The Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States The Katharine Houghton Hepburn Center at Bryn Mawr College will present the 2015 Katharine Hepburn Medal to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, announced College President Kim Cassidy today at a ceremony marking the start of the academic year. The medal will be awarded to Justice Sotomayor at a gala event in Bryn Mawr’s Goodhart Hall on April 17, 2015. The Katharine Hepburn Medal recognizes women who change their worlds: those whose lives, work, and contributions embody the intelligence, drive, and independence of the four-time Oscar winner and her namesake mother, an early feminist activist.  Award recipients are chosen on the basis of their commitment and contributions to the Hepburn women’s greatest passions—civic engagement and the arts. “As the first Hispanic and third female Supreme Court justice, Justice Sotomayor is truly a trailblazer,” said Cassidy. “Her twenty-year commitment to the federal judiciary reveals her unwavering commitment both to public service and the importance of the legal system in our society and exemplifies the attributes deserving of the Hepburn Medal.   Equally important, Justice Sotomayor’s many opinions from the bench, whether in the majority or expressing critical interests from a dissent, exhibit wisdom, an unflinching commitment to justice, and a fundamental dedication to real equality in our divers...  

This New Novartis AG Drug May Revolutionize Heart Failure Treatment

Doctors have long struggled to effectively treat heart failure caused by high blood pressure. ACE inhibitors, like enalapril -- formerly sold by Merck (NYSE: MRK  ) as the branded drug Vasotec, came on the scene in the 1990s, and ARB inhibitors, like Novartis' (NYSE: NVS  ) Diovan, which won approval in 1997, remain first line therapies in the fight to prevent heart disease. However, despite those medicines being widely prescribed, high blood pressure remains inadequately treated and that means a greater percentage of people suffer heart failure every year. Estimates suggest that as many as 50% of those who should be taking drugs that lower blood pressure don't take them and discouragingly, only a third of those who do take them have their blood pressure under adequate control. Fortunately, a new drug making its way to regulators from Novartis may offer patients new hope. This past weekend, Novartis released full study results from phase 3 trials of LCZ696, a combination therapy that is made up of the company's Diovan and a new drug, AHU-377. Source: Novartis A changing marketAccording to Express Scripts, high blood pressure is the third highest cost indication behind diabetes and high cholesterol, but spending on ACE inhibitors and ARBs is expected to fall through at least 2016 due to the launch of new generic versions of the blockbuster Diovan. Express Scripts thinks that generic Diovan will be just as successful as generic ACE inh...  

Music lessons may boost poor kids' brainpower, study suggests

Back to school 32 minutes ago Courtesy the Burgos family The five children in the Burgos family have all studied a musical instrument and excel in school. From left, Stephen, 20, Monica, 16, mom Maria Elena, Theresa, 11, dad Rene, Elizabeth, 22, and Martin, 18. Music lessons may rev up young brains enough to help close the academic gap between rich and poor, a new study suggests.Researchers from Northwestern University found that after two years of music lessons, the brains of kids from poor, gang-infested neighborhoods interpreted speech sounds more quickly and precisely, an improvement that might lead to better language and reading skills, according to the study published in the Journal of Neuroscience.  The new findings come as tightening budgets have led more and more schools in poorer districts to chop arts programs, including music instruction, as nonessential to kids’ educations.Though earlier research had shown that music training seems to have a global impact on kids’ academic achievement, there was no proof that it actually affected kids’ brains. That led Northwestern University researchers to look for a biological basis to explain how music training might help make kids “smarter.” As it turns out, “there is considerable overlap in the circuitry involved in processing language and music,” said the study’s lead author, Nina Kraus, a professor and director of the university’s Auditory Neuroscience La...  

Sugar leaves sour taste in Latta's mouth

JIMMY RYAN Last updated 09:00 03/09/2014 Supplied NIGEL LATTA: Focusing on issues affecting New Zealand. Nigel Latta's six-part series that focuses on issues affecting New Zealand drew to a close last night, with the series finale focusing on the effects sugar is having on the country's population. In an episode which was engineered to let first hand experiences and evidence do the talking, Latta himself became a guinea pig while explaining to the viewer his initial assumptions and beliefs about sugar, and noting how they had changed once the facts were presented. Latta began the hour by interviewing one of the world's most well known and outspoken experts on the subject, Professor Robert Lustig, an American paediatric endocrinologist at the University of California.  Lustig cites liver fat, cell ageing, and interference with brain function in regard to eating habits as three of the things that, to him, makes it toxic. Lustig also compares sugar to tobacco in terms of its damage to people. Latta took a stroll through the aisles of a supermarket to test Lustig's claim that sugar is being slipped into almost everything on the shelves. Latta was alarmed to find how high the volumes of sugar were in everyday products such as tomato sauce, baked beans, tuna and Marmite. Food technologist Melanie Walsh explained that sugar is most often used as a substitute for more expensive ingredients which helps lower costs. Latta was surprised to hear that the product marketers have a lo...  

Is California in a megadrought?

California is in the third year of one of the state's worst droughts in the past century, one that's led to fierce wildfires, water shortages and restrictions, and potentially staggering agricultural losses.The dryness in California is only part of a longer-term, 15-year drought across most of the Western USA, one that bioclimatologist Park Williams said is notable because "more area in the West has persistently been in drought during the past 15 years than in any other 15-year period since the 1150s and 1160s" — that's more than 850 years ago."When considering the West as a whole, we are currently in the midst of a historically relevant megadrought," said Williams, a professor at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University in New York.Megadroughts are what Cornell University scientist Toby Ault calls the "great white sharks of climate: powerful, dangerous and hard to detect before it's too late. They have happened in the past, and they are still out there, lurking in what is possible for the future, even without climate change." Ault goes so far as to call megadroughts "a threat to civilization."WHAT IS A MEGADROUGHT?Megadroughts are defined more by their duration than their severity. They are extreme dry spells that can last for a decade or longer, according to research meteorologist Martin Hoerling of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.Megadroughts have parched the West, including present-day California, long before Europeans settled...  

Equities, Commodities & Bonds Finish Lower On First Trading Day Of The Month

The S&P 500 struggled to maintain the psychological 2,000 point level amid sell offs in commodities and bonds. Volume continues to remain light despite a largely anticipated uptick in trading following Labor Day. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 30.9 points, or 0.18 percent, to close at 17,068.6. The S&P 500 dropped 1.1 points, or 0.05 percent, to close at 2002.3. The Nasdaq gave added 17.9 points, or 0.4 percent, to close at 4,598.2. Top Stories Casino stocks were of the hardest hit Tuesday after a six percent drop in August gaming revenue. The drop in sales comes after an increase in regulation for the semi-autonomous city by the Chinese government. A conference, expected to end in October, should give more detail on future policy. Shares of Tesla (NASDAQ: TSLA) made an all-time high Monday after the research house Stifel put a $400 price target on the stock. Shares closed 5.8 percent higher at $284.05. Compuware (NASDAQ: CPWR) will be going private for $2.5 billion, or $10.92 per share. The deal will be led by private equity firm Thoma Bravo. Shares of Compuware last traded hands at 10.59. Dollar General (NYSE: DG) increased its bid for Family Dollar (NYSE: FDO) to $80 per share, beating Dollar Tree’s (NASDAQ: DLTR) most recent offer. Dollar General indicated it is willing to pay the $500 million breakup fee and divest up to 1,500 stores. Stock Movers Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings (NASDAQ: NCLH) shares shot up 11.1 percent to $36.99 afte...  

Back to school: Why aren't more girls choosing science?

Bryanna Gilges, 15, left, and Yvonne Gonzalez, 17, right, work at completing an exercise during a Girls Who Code class at Adobe Systems in San Jose, Calif. The program aims to inspire and equip young women for futures in the computing-related fields. AP Photo/Eric Risberg TORONTO – On a Friday or Saturday night, 15-year-old Maggie Fei can often be found on the grounds of the David Dunlap Observatory in Richmond Hill, Ontario, eyes to the sky.Maggie is a volunteer at the DDO, an observatory run by volunteers from the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, Toronto Centre. Maggie’s not there to get her required volunteer hours – she obtained those long ago. Maggie’s there because she loves science. Volunteers gather at the David Dunlap Observatory in Richmond Hill. Nicole Mortillaro “I’m interested in a lot of different things,” she said. “But I know I want to study some kind of science as my major in university.”But studies show that, though there’s been an increase in women pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and math fields – referred to as STEM – men still dominate. A 2010 study by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada found that in 2008-2009 there were 15,933  males enrolled in natural sciences and engineering doctorates (fu...  

Alitalia restarts Venezuela flights after hiatus due to forex dispute

Reuters CARACAS (Reuters) - Italian airline Alitalia has started to fly to Venezuela again after a near two-month halt when carriers trimmed operations following government delays in releasing ticket revenue under the country's strict currency controls. Alitalia restarts Venezuela flights after hiatus due to forex dispute Several carriers have cut or curbed flights to Venezuela in recent months because they are required to sell tickets in the local bolivar currency but the cash-strapped government has not granted them approval to repatriate that revenue. "Representatives of Alitalia have ratified their faith in Venezuela and are restarting their operations," Water and Air Transportation Minister Luis Graterol was quoted as saying by the official state news agency AVN on Tuesday. Alitalia did not provide reasons for suspending or resuming service. The airline will offer two flights per week between Caracas and Rome. It had run five per week until May, when it reduced the frequency to two. The International Air Transport Association (IATA), which represents around 240 global airlines, said in July that while Venezuela had permitted repatriation of $424 million shared among some airlines, $4.1 billion of airline ticket sales remained trapped in the country. (Reporting by Eyanir Chinea; Editing by Richard Chang) Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures...  

Couple Donates $50K To East Quogue Elementary Science Program

East Quogue Elementary School sixth-graders will get to experience the creatures of the deep in a brand new way this year: through a 150-gallon saltwater tank that will soon be put on display thanks to a $50,000 donation to the Central Avenue school’s science program.The donation from Kevin and Lynn Crowe of Quogue was accepted by the Board of Education during its August 26 meeting, specifically to fund what is being called the East Quogue Science Program. School officials expect to order the new tank—and its future inhabitants—within the next few weeks.“In my 25 years in education, I have never seen anything quite like this,” said Principal Robert Long, referring to the donation. “We are so grateful and so excited.”Over the summer, Mr. Long began meeting with the Crowes and a small committee that included Jackie Martin, a sixth grade science teacher at the school, and Diane and Chris Gobler, local scientists who have children attending the district. Ms. Gobler also serves on the Board of Education. Working together, they made an outline for a new marine science program that will incorporate field trips, guest speakers, field studies, as well as in-class experiments utilizing the specimens that will be kept in the saltwater tank, which will be placed in the foyer outside the main office.Mr. Long explained that students will be collecting fish and other sea life to add to the tank throughout the school year. He also noted that o...  

Why you should take the stairs: Exercising for up to an hour a day 'halves the ...

Up to an hour of daily exercise can slash your risk of heart failure by 46%Heart failure prevents enough blood being pumped around the bodyOccurs because the heart muscle has become too weak or stiff to work  Swedish researchers found the more active a person, the lower the risk Taking the stairs, walking or cycling are simple steps to cut riskExperts advocate making towns and cities easier to walk or cycle around Exercising up to an hour a day can slash your risk of heart failure by nearly half, according to new research.A Swedish study found that more than an hour of moderate exercise or half an hour of vigorous exercise can cut heart failure by 46 percent.Published their findings in the journal Circulation: Heart, researchers found that the more active a person, the lower their risk of heart failure. Swedish researchers found that more than an hour of moderate exercise of half an hour of vigorous exercise can cut heart failure by 46 per centThey added that taking the stairs rather than the lift, walking or cycling are simple steps to cut risk.Heart failure prevents enough blood being pumped around the body at the right pressure and usually occurs because the heart muscle has become too weak or stiff to work properly.It affects more than 750,000 people in the UK, NHS figures show.Risk of death within five years of diagnosis is 30 per cent to 50 per cent, researchers said.The study looked at 39,805 people aged 20 to 90 who had no heart problems when the study...  


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