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Faster heart rate may indicate diabetes risk

Washington, May 24:   People with faster resting heart rate are at an increased risk of developing diabetes, a new large—scale study has warned. An association between resting heart rate and diabetes suggests that heart rate measures could identify individuals with a higher future risk of diabetes, researchers said. In a four—year study of 73,357 Chinese adults, researchers observed that faster heart rates were positively associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes. Researchers also found that faster heart rates were associated with impaired fasting glucose levels and a conversion from impaired fasting glucose levels to diabetes among the same population. “In this study, we measured resting heart rate among about 100,000 Chinese adults and followed them for four years,” said Xiang Gao, associate professor of nutritional sciences, Pennsylvania State University and a senior study author. “We found participants with faster heart rates, suggesting lower automatic function, had increased risk of diabetes, pre—diabetes, and conversion from pre—diabetes to diabetes. “Each additional 10 beats per minute was associated with 23 per cent increased risk of diabetes, similar to the effects of a 3 kilogramme per metre square increase in body mass index,” said Gao. Researchers combined their results with those of seven previously published studies including 97,653 men and women in total, on the same topic...  

Taking action: Plan outlines ways to fix mental health system

BLOOMINGTON — Repairing a splintered mental health system that has failed to support children and adults in crisis and left dozens without a permanent home will require a public-private partnership, according to a new report issued by the McLean County Board.The Mental Health Action Plan, 15 months in the making, lays out multiple objectives for county government, service providers and community members to address widely recognized deficiencies in services for mentally ill residents.The move by the County Board to spearhead the study is unique, said Alan Sender, chief operating officer of Chestnut Health Systems."This was a very large undertaking and not something you normally expect county government to act on," said Sender.The origin of the report comes from a 2012 study by the National Institute of Corrections of housing conditions for mentally ill inmates at the McLean County jail. It quickly put the county on notice that its use of the booking area was not appropriate. The NIC also had harsh words for mental health programs that consultants said were inadequate to handle community needs.In response, the County Board named two advisory panels in February 2014 to look at ways to address the mental health issues. Their initial findings are the basis for the final report released by the board last week.The county is currently reviewing several options for a jail expansion to address housing problems for mentally ill and female inmates.Closing the gapCounty Board memb...  

El Nino: The good, the bad and the currencies

El Nino is coming, according to Australia's Bureau of Meteorology, and that weather event spells disruptions to global agricultural production, with worldwide economic consequences. Countries bordering the Pacific Ocean and, globally, economies where food prices are a major component of the consumer price index (CPI) may be particularly susceptible to El Nino's impact. A "band of above-average ocean surface temperatures that periodically develops off the Pacific coast of South America, and causes major climatological changes around the world" is how an April 2015 International Monetary Fund (IMF) working paper, "Fair Weather or Foul? The Macroeconomic Effects of El Nino", defined the weather phenomenon. El Nino can constrain agricultural production, "create food-price and generalised inflation, and may trigger social unrest in commodity-dependent countries that primarily rely on imported food", the IMF paper argued. Its economic consequences "are large, statistically significant, and highly heterogeneous across different regions", the study discovered. El Nino's effects create economic winners and losers. The US and, to a lesser extent, China have been winners. "El Nino typically brings wet weather to California," said the study, good news for the drought-stricken Golden State, as well as having a benign impact on the rest of the US. US gross domestic product picks up beginning two quarters after the start of El Nino, according to the IMF findings, prompting a positive spillo...  

GreatHorse in Hampden opens to members, fanfare as elite golf club in Northeast

HAMPDEN - And down the stretch they come . . . The finishing touches are coming together on GreatHorse, the latest and highly-anticipated golf experience in Western Massachusetts. But a new name and logo are not all that have replaced the former Hampden Country Club. How about a $45 million overhaul that should bring the 18-hole, private golf course and its facilities to heights of the elite in the Northeast? "It's been a long time coming,'' GreatHorse president Guy Antonacci said. "You have to go to a place like Long Island, or even Boston, to find something like this.'' The Wilbraham Road club, owned by the Antonacci family of Somers, Conn., opened this weekend for membership play and use. "We're calling it a 'pre-grand opening,' '' Antonacci said of the opening for its charter members. "The rest will come later.'' Long known for what Antonacci has called a "100-mile view'' to the west, the club's 26,000-square foot "mountain rustic'' clubhouse and 10,000-square foot outdoor patio are signature, hillside features. "The golf industry is not exactly booming, so to present a project like this to people . . . it's re-energizing to everybody,'' GreatHorse head professional Billy Downes said. Antonacci said the club's single-word name, without reference to golf club or country club, derived from the Italian translation of Leonardo Da Vinci's late 15th century "Gran Cavallo'' statue. "It was innovative then and the name related to my family's history with horses,'' An...  

Saina Nehwal-PV Sindhu Clash Likely at Indonesia Open

Saina and Sindhu may face off in Jakarta.Jakarta: World No.1 shuttler Saina Nehwal has been seeded second and faces a likely clash against compatriot P.V. Sindhu in only the second round of the women's singles at the $800,000 Indonesia Open Superseries Premier to be held here from June 2 to 7.Saina, who has won here in 2009, 2010 and 2012, first takes on Thai Nichaon Jindapon against whom the Indian has won all three meetings yet. World No.12 Sindhu faces Hsu Ya Ching of Chinese Taipei. If both the Hyderabadi girls win, it means a clash of the two Indian badminton queens at the Istora Gelora Bung Karno Stadium.Saina won the only official match played against Sindhu, winning the final in straight games to lift the India Grand Prix Gold Trophy in January 2014.Reigning Olympic champion Li Xuerui of China has been seeded first.In men's singles, World No. 4 Kidambi Srikanth has been seeded No.4 and opens his campaign against Danish World No.14 Hans-Kristian Vittinghus, who has a 1-0 advantage in career meetings of the Guntur-born.Parupalli Kashyap is also in the same half of the draw and take on Thai Tanongsak Saensomboonsuk in the opener.Pranaav Chopra and Akshay Dewalkar and Manu Attri and B. Sumeeth Reddy are the two Indian pairs in men's doubles while two-time Commonwealth Games medallists Jwala Gutta and Ashwini Ponnappa will lead the Indian challenge in women's doubles.There will be no Indian representation in mixed doubles. Story first published on: Sunday, 24 May 2015 16:0...  

US Republicans navigate the new politics of energy abundance

REFILE - ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker, potential Republican presidential candidate, speaks at the Southern Republican Leadership Conference in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma May 21, 2015. REUTERS/Rick Wilking By James OliphantOKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. (Reuters) - U.S. Republicans have had to watch from the sidelines as the Obama White House has taken political credit for America's unexpected energy boom and tumbling gas prices. Now it has left their presidential candidates scrambling for a way to reclaim leadership on an issue the party once seemed to own.Their apparent answer: calling time on a 40-year-old federal ban on crude oil exports and using the newfound energy bounty to strategic advantage."We've got an abundance of supply," Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker said this week in Oklahoma at a gathering of putative Republican candidates for next year's presidential election. Lifting the ban, he said, would allow exports to "our allies in Europe, where, instead of being dependent on (President) Vladimir Putin and the Russians, they could be dependent on Americans."President Barack Obama's administration has allowed small exceptions but has said it will not open the door to crude exports as long as the United States is still importing some oil. Even the Republican-led Congress has been reluctant to push too quickly for an end to the export ban, fearing political repercussions should gas prices spike in the aftermath.But several in the ranks of Republican presi...  

This is no cold fish!

Fish as a rule stay the temperature of the water around them. Not the opah. As it hunts in the ocean’s dark depths, this fish keeps much of its body distinctly warmer than the frigid water around it. That makes this species the closest of any fish to the warm-bloodedness typical of birds and mammals.The opah (Lampris guttatus) is about the size of a car tire and almost as round. That shape helps explain why the opah is sometimes called a moonfish. This animal swims by using its large pectoral muscles to move its skinny, red pectoral fins. Those muscles also produce a lot of heat.The opah has structures never before seen in fish gills that may help conserve that warmth in its blood, says Nick Wegner of the Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, Calif. This lab is run by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Heat tends to speed up chemical reactions that take place inside cells. That allows an animal to move and respond to its environment more quickly.Its unusual gills and other heat-saving features don’t allow the opah to maintain the same high and stable body temperatures seen in mammals and birds. (Being warm-blooded, or endothermic, means those creatures can control their body temperature as their surroundings get warmer or cooler.) Still, measurements suggest that the opah can keep its heart and some other important tissues several degrees warmer than the cold water in which it swims, Wegner and his colleagues say. They described detai...  

11 problems music can solve

Music is a splendid thing. It can cheer you up when you're sad, make you dance like a fool, and allow you to drown out the world when you need to. But music has its scientific uses, too. The documentary Alive Inside details how dementia patients react positively when given iPods filled with their old favorite songs. The music seems to help them "come alive" again. While listening to familiar songs, many of the documentary's patients can sing along, answer questions about their past, and even carry on brief conversations with others. "Music imprints itself on the brain deeper than any other human experience," says neurologist Oliver Sacks, who appears in the film. "Music evokes emotion, and emotion can bring with it memory." The documentary follows recent studies showing that music can improve the memories of dementia patients, and even help them develop new memories. Here, a look at some other things music has been known to "cure": 1. Low birth weight Babies born too early often require extended stays in the hospital to help them gain weight and strength. To help facilitate this process, many hospitals turn to music. A team of Canadian researchers found that playing music to preemies reduced their pain levels and encouraged better feeding habits, which in turn helped with weight-gain. Hospitals use musical instruments to mimic the sounds of a mother's heartbeat and womb to lull premature babies to sleep. Researchers also say that playing calming Mozart to premature inf...  

San Francisco Bay cruises offer entertainment for holiday

Make your day: If you’re sitting at home right now, you can still turn this Memorial Day Weekend into an adventure you’ll never forget. At Fisherman’s Wharf, the $15 Bay sightseeing tours, with a cruise around Alcatraz and the Golden Gate Bridge, are under way for summer on five salmon fishing boats. No reservations needed. Just show up and climb aboard. Getting there: The trip to Fisherman’s Wharf can be an adventure, not a chore. Take BART, the train or ferry to San Francisco, then take the cable car (or walk) to Fisherman’s Wharf. What you’ll see: The boat exits the harbor amid the commercial fleet operations, then enters the open water of the bay for panoramic views. Most skippers turn right for lookouts across the waterfront to Coit Tower, venture left for the cruise to Alcatraz and then head west for passage under the Golden Gate Bridge. Every minute of the way, the views are spectacular. The return trip along the Presidio, Crissy Field and Marina Green provides a unique perspective of a familiar home. Weather: Bring a windbreaker for wind chill. Location: At Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco, at the foot of Jones and Jefferson, along the front row of Fisherman’s Wharf between Castagnola’s and Tarantino’s restaurants. Party boat tours or fishing: ...  

From dream to reality? If UAB football is reinstated, how long, and what it ...

The once unthinkable now seems possible: UAB football could be resurrected. UAB boosters are feverishly working to raise enough funds to persuade UAB president Ray Watts that reinstating the team, which was shut down in December, will be financially feasible. Watts has said he will announce his decision by June 1. Is football if reinstated, what can fans expect? For starters, a team likely won't return to the Football Bowl Series (FBS) level until 2017, if not later if the Blazers are forced to play Football Championship Series (FCS) level competition during their "comeback" season. Even that could be an aggressive timeline given how long it has taken other startup programs to reach that level of competition. "I think you have to give yourself a two to a two-and-a-half-year lead-time window before you play your first game," Old Dominion athletic director Wood Selig told Al.com. "You have to build your budget; you have to hire your staff, and you have to recruit. "You have to have between two and three years before you even begin competition to make sure you go about initiating a program in a thoughtful and successful way." Hurdles everywhere to overcome In between, UAB will need to overcome numerous challenges. For instance, who will coach? The answer is as certain (or uncertain) as everything else surrounding the program these days. Bill Clark's contract runs out at the end of next year. He's indicated a willingness to stay at the school, but while reinstatement of ...  


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