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Trending 'sunburn art' of this summer may increase risk of skin cancers by 50%

It is summertime and the scorching hot the temperatures, high UV rays and sunburns comes free with it and for some, a hazardous summer trend called ‘sunburn art’ is drawing a lot of attention.  “It is intense sunburn, which increases your risk for melanoma which is the most deadly of the skin cancers,” says Dr. Obeime Christopher,a board certified diplomate of the American Board of Dermatology. It is now trending to use sun screen for drawing logs and various designs on their body before they step out in the sun. They are seeking to get severely sunburned all for achieving this hazardous art. Dermatologist are warning people that this new trend might be increasing their risk by 50% and can make smooth and tight skin age at a much faster pace. Dr. Obeime says, “The collagen gets fragmented and gets old, it looks like old skin. The more sun exposure you have the sooner your skin gets the changes that we are talking about.” Doctors have recommended that people should apply SPF 30 sun block when spending time outdoors and should reapply them if they have sweated on taken a dip in the water. The spray doesn’t cover exposed skin the way creams do, according to dermatologists. Dr. Obeime says, “You don’t need to have SPF 100; if you apply 30 SPF and you apply it correctly with reapplication as needed. I think you are doing just as good of a job as if you are applying 100 SPF.” American Cancer Society...  

Stars' spiral arms cradle baby planets

A protoplanetary disk around a young star, from a new theoretical model by astronomer Alan Boss. Notice the spiral structure extending outward from the central star. Image via Carnegie Institution for Science. A new study from the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington D.C. offers a potential solution to the question of how small rocky planets like our Earth come to be. A puzzle relates to how dust grains in a disk around a newly forming star avoid being dragged into the star before enough of the grains stick together to have strong-enough gravity to begin pulling in more grains … and ultimately grow into planets. Published in the Astrophysical Journal on June 25, 2015, lead researcher Alan Boss shows in his theoretical study that newly forming stars, called protostars, can scatter small rocky bodies outward during periods of “gravitational instability” in the disk. Boss’ work links this phase of instability with spiral arms now known to exist around some young stars. According to modern theories about how rocky planets form, during the infant stages of star formation, disks of gas and dust surround protostars. These are called protoplanetary disks. The dust and debris in the disks collide and coalesce, slowly gaining mass and gravity, eventually becoming planetesimals, which are small bodies that fuse with others in order to create planets. Previous theoretical models have been unable to explain how the planetesimals – mainly t...  

Cause and (plug-in developer) effect of the Adobe Creative Cloud ecosystem

If there’s one constant in the universe, it’s that nothing stays the same. Everything changes at some point—call it progress, evolution, devolution or whatever you want. The problem is that change is scary, especially when it affects your livelihood. For example, many would say that Adobe upset the software apple cart by bundling their apps into Creative Cloud and switching from perpetual licensing to a subscription-based model. Creative pros weren’t comfortable with the idea of renting software, regardless of any advantages. The controversy rages on, and Adobe’s Creative Cloud subscription model continues to wreak havoc on third-party (non-Adobe) plug-ins that interact with Creative Cloud apps. Things have a gotten a bit messy. The setup Before Creative Cloud cropped up, Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator users were hyper aware of each major upgrade, because they had to fork over serious money to get it. Now upgrades arrive with no additional payment required beyond the ongoing (and easily forgettable) monthly Creative Cloud fee. Upgrading is as convenient as clicking an Update button—a process we’ve all been conditioned to perform for free incremental updates from software companies (Adobe included) for years. Adobe’s intended effect with Creative Cloud was to make customers less sensitive to the actual cost of each major revision, since it’s amortized over many months of payments. Adobe’s unintended e...  

Security Council split on Srebrenica resolution

2 Jul 2015 - 9:44 PM  UPDATED 39 MINS AGO (Transcript from World News Radio) Deep divisions have emerged in the United Nations Security Council over a draft resolution commemorating the 1995 Srebrenica massacre in Bosnia. The British-drafted resolution has angered Bosnian Serbs and Serbia, and Russia is promoting an alternative text, ahead of a vote next week. Kristina Kukolja has the details. (Click on audio tab to listen to this item) On July 11, 1995, towards the end of Bosnia's 1992-95 war, Bosnian Serb forces swept into the Srebrenica enclave in eastern Bosnia. It had been declared by the UN as a supposed "safe haven". But in the days that followed, more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys sheltering in the enclave were executed by the Bosnian Serbs, and their bodies dumped into pits. The draft British Security Council resolution strongly condemns the killings, describing it as 'genocide'. Britain's UN Ambassador Matthew Rycroft told a Srebrenica memorial event it's important not to try to deny what happened. "This resolution does not seek to bring up painful divisions, nor point the finger of blame. I'm sure that every Security Council member who reads the text will see that it is balanced. This is the moment for the Security Council to show through this resolution that we are committed to making 'never again' a reality." Diplomats and survivors of the Srebrenica massacre at the event at UN headquarters observed a moment of silence to honour the victims. ...  

DARPA's digital co-pilot will "transform" pilots

Up in the air, pilot Mike Ward is used to being at the controls, but now an experimental technology called Aircrew Labor In-Cockpit Automation System (ALIAS) is doing the flying for him, reports CBS News correspondent Kris Van Cleave. "In terms of the actual operation of the craft... it's a completely different world," Ward said.ALIAS is an advanced form of autopilot that can adapt and respond to changing situations. Essentially it's a digital co-pilot.Helicopter maker Sikorsky's chief autonomy engineer Igor Cherepinsky said it won't put pilots out of business, but it will "transform" them. "Today's pilots spend a lot of their time making sure the aircraft is stable, it's going in the right direction, its going the right speed, obeying the laws of the air if you will, so ALIAS copilot can take care of all of that and free the human being to supervise and make sure that the bigger mission is running its course," Cherepinsky said. That's different from drones, which essentially move pilots to the ground -- this technology keeps people in the air. Cherepinsky compared it to driverless cars, predicting that, one day, there might not be anyone sitting in the cockpit during flight."The first step is to let the pilots get used to the technology, reduce the crew, and show that we can do it safely with one pilot and get the pilot community used to that fact. And then we'll go from there," he said. The technology is promising enough that the Defense Advance Research Project Agency (DA...  

Enough of Hong Kong's mobile phone zombie menaces to society

I’ve just about had enough of mobile phone zombies everywhere I go in Hong Kong. At best, they’re a public nuisance and, at worst, they’re a menace, posing a danger to themselves and others around them. I’m talking about this annoying species of Hongkongers who walk around with their noses buried in their smartphones, oblivious to how they’re impeding the flow of humanity and irritating the heck out of everyone else. They’re everywhere – right in front of you, blocking your path, whether you’re navigating your passage along our narrow, overcrowded city streets, rushing to catch a train or bus, or even getting on and off the escalator in a shopping mall. Just the other day, I had a run-in with a zombie in a crowded mall. She had her headphones plugged in and was not looking where she was going, obviously expecting me to get out of the way, along with anyone else who might be on a collision course with her. When I couldn’t manoeuvre to the side in time, we suffered a mini-crash, and what followed was a bit of a human traffic snarl, compounded in part by our brief staring contest. What really floored me, more than the actual physical impact of bumping into her, was the look of genuine outrage on her face. This was a person who, as far as she was concerned, was supremely within her rights to shuffle along in a crowded public place without paying heed to anyone around her because she was preoccupied with her phone. Eve...  

Self-Fertilizing Worm Injects Sperm Into its Own Head

Consider yourself lucky that your sex life is far more fun and exciting in comparison to what you'll learn about a flatworm called Macrostomum hystrix that happens to have a bizarre reproductive ritual worthy of sci-fi horror films.Like Us on Facebook In an report by BGR, every M. hystrix worm is a hermaphrodite, or having both male and female reproductive system. If this makes reproduction sound easy, think again. When two of these worms find a potential mate, they try stabbing each other with their needle-like penises called a "stylet" in a kind of fencing match. The winner gets to assume the role of male and the loser becomes the female who will give birth to their offspring. In the course that no mate is available, this species of flatworm always have the option to self-inseminate. The Scientist reports that the M. hystrix is the only animal with the distinct behavior of using their needle-like penis to inseminate themselves by injecting sperm into their head, according to a paper recently published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. For anatomical reasons, the worms have no choice, but to put their sperm in their head because it is easy for their penis to reach. The sperm travels from the injection site-usually in the mid-body or tail region-to the female sex organs near the head. Moreover, the female sex organ is located near the head, making insemination less tedious. Daily Mail reports that Biologists from the University of Ba...  

Ravenscraig memorial to those who lost their lives in iron and steel industry ...

The plans were forged three years ago – and now a memorial to commemorating those who lost their lives in the Scottish iron and steel industry has been unveiled at Ravenscraig. It is situated next to the Ravenscraig Regional Sports Facility, symbolising Lanarkshire’s regeneration and a new start. Created by leading Scottish sculptor Andy Scott, the memorial is now a reality thanks to civic pride campaign Supercounty and a fundraising committee led by chairman Terry Currie, a former British Steel employee and Deputy Lieutenant of Lanarkshire. Businesses across Lanarkshire and Scotland as well as local authorities, trade unions and private individuals have been instrumental in securing project funding. Roy Rickhuss, general secretary of Community, the Steelworkers Union, unveiled the statue at the sports centre alongside Terry Currie and Andy Scott. He said: “Our members are at the heart of Scotland’s steel heritage and this memorial serves as a poignant reminder to those who lost their lives working in Scotland’s steel and iron industry. For generations, the steel industry sustained communities across Scotland and made a substantial contribution to our nation’s economy. The Scottish steel industry remains an active part of many communities and many families across Scotland to this day. “The Scottish Steelworkers Memorial is a result of the hard work of a small but dedicated group of activists who recognised the need to create a...  

Gerrymandering didn't make politics this vicious. But vicious politics will ...

It is endlessly suspicious when politicians control the process by which they and their allies are elected. Yet Arizona lawmakers had been battling their own citizens for precisely this power, in a lawsuit that culminated Monday in a 5-4 Supreme Court decision upholding the right of voters — not legislators — to control how electoral districts are drawn. In 2000, Arizonans voted to take the state legislature out of the redistricting process. They hoped to curb partisan gerrymandering by creating an independent, bipartisan commission that would handle the duty of redrawing state and federal voting districts after every Census. The commission’s redistricting plan led to Democratic wins in 2012, which upset the GOP-controlled legislature. Republicans claimed that the whole process was unconstitutional because the founding fathers specifically commanded state legislatures to run elections. They were referring to the Constitution’s Elections Clause, which reads as follows: The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Con­gress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations . . . . Yes, this is another Supreme Court case that hinges on the meaning of a word. Here, the word is “legislature.” Does the Constitution refer solely to a state’s body of elected representatives? Or does the term “legislature” here lend itself to a broader interpretation, one...  

N.J. Politics Roundup: Christie says he never smoked pot; governor receives ...

TRENTON — A day after announcing he is running for the Republican nomination for president, Gov. Chris Christie told reporters in New Hampshire on Wednesday that he has never smoked marijuana. Christie also visited Maine and received the endorsement of the state's GOP governor.  He said President Obama is "dead wrong" for permitting the U.S. and Cuba to open embassies in their capital cities. In TV interviews, Christie touted how he knows how to reach across the aisle and that New Jersey Democrats and the "liberal media" are to blame for being knocked down in the polls. Meanwhile, here are seven things you may not know about First Lady Mary Pat Christie. And here is a look at what the press across the U.S. said about Christie's presidential announcement.  NEW 2016 POLLS A new poll of the nation's registered Republican voters shows Christie is one of three candidates tied for 10th place in the 2016 GOP race. Another new poll of Iowa Republicans shows the governor is 15th in the field of 16 declared or likely GOP presidential candidates. Meanwhile, Christie officially filed papers to run. Both Christie and the Democratic National Committee spent Wednesday trying to raise money off the governor's candidacy. Star-Ledger columnist Tom Moran writes that Christie joined the presidential field four years too late. Here are six possible cont...  


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