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FBI releases Malware Investigator portal to industry players

The FBI's Malware Investigator portal will soon be available to security researchers, academics and businesses. As reported by Threatpost, the US law enforcement agency's tool is akin to systems used by cybersecurity companies to upload suspicious files. Once a file is uploaded, the system pushes through antimalware engines to pull out information on the file -- whether it is malicious, what the malware does, and whom it effects. The Malware Investigator analyses threats through sandboxing, file modification, section hashing, correlation against other submissions and the FBI's own entries concerning viruses and malware reports. Windows files and common file types can currently be analysed, but this will expand to include other file types in the near future. The FBI says that businesses will find this tool particularly useful, stating on the portal's website: "Public and private sector networks are constantly dealing with malware aimed at disrupting operations, stealing information, and/or interfering with daily business. IT professionals must react nimbly to potential issues, but can only make well informed decisions when they can quickly understand the potential threat to their systems." Speaking at the Virus Bulletin conference in Seattle, the FBI's Jonathan Burns said API access has been granted for businesses that wish to integrate the engine into their platforms, and the personal details of submitters remain undisclosed and private. While the standard...  

Oil industry 'needs to cut costs even if it means job losses'

There have been recent job losses in the industry The oil and gas industry must do more to cut costs even if it means more job losses, it has been claimed. Industry body Oil and Gas UK's annual economic report said operating costs were 60% higher than three years ago while oil prices were falling. There have already been substantial layoffs at companies this year. Shell UK announced 250 onshore jobs cuts from its North Sea operation in Aberdeen in August, after Chevron announced 225 in July. Oil and Gas UK's chief executive Malcolm Webb said: "This country depends on oil and gas for some 70% of our primary energy needs and oil and gas from the UK offshore areas supply nearly 50% of that. "Our industry has a crucial role to play in the future wellbeing of this country. "To support a lasting and sustainable future, today we're calling for greater collaboration - between governments, between government and industry and within industry itself to face and fight the challenges ahead." He said: "Full implementation of Sir Ian Wood's recommendations for regulatory reform, and far-sighted changes to the fiscal regime, are needed in the next 12 to 18 months to stimulate new investment in exploration and production. "Alongside this, the industry must improve its efficiency and reduce its costs as a matter of utmost urgency." ...  

Iron ore price hits five-year low in poor month for commodities

Feeling the pinch: Wheat prices have been hammered by booming global production. Photo: Virginia Star Iron ore led the way down in a shocking month for Australia's key commodities, crashing to a fresh five-year low overnight on Monday. Australia's most lucrative export dived 1.2 per cent to $US77.70 a tonne, taking the month's losses to 8 per cent. But it's not just the Pilbara feeling the pinch. Wheat crops from Dimboola to Dubbo are also feeling the pinch of lower prices. Booming wheat production across the globe has hammered the price of the grain – Australia's sixth biggest export, which was worth about $6 billion in 2013 – to a four-year low. Advertisement The global price for wheat slid 12.5 per cent to $US481.25 in the past month, extending the losses from its year peak in May to 36.8 per cent. Analysts say rising supply from Europe and the Black Sea region has outstripped demand, and prices are expected to remain soft until early next year. It's not the only crop notching up losses. Corn, a key industrial food and drink-making material, has sunk 9.3 per cent for the month, while soybeans have plummeted 15.24 per cent. Again, the falls have been attributed to oversupply. The US Department of Agriculture has forecast global oilseed supply to hit a record 528 million tonnes in 2014-15. Waning demand, particularly from Asia, has also hit the gold price, which has continued its slump, falling 5.6 per cent in September to $US1215.36 an ounce. ANZ gold analyst...  

These 4 things can improve your heart health in 60-minutes!

September 29 is the World Heart Day. Do you take a one-hour lunch break? If you don’t, you should start. With statistical evidences showing 1 in 5 workers don’t take a lunch break and that more than 60% employees eat lunch at their desk, the trend could be doing more harm than good to their health. This holds true as the rising cases of heart diseases in India are attributed to unhealthy eating habits and a sedentary lifestyle. Since most of us spend around 9 hours a day at our workplace, utilizing this time to improve our health is not a bad idea! To start with it, the most effective and important measure is to convert your lunch-breaks into a heart-healthy one hour. Here are few tips on how you can go about it and improve your heart health in simple yet effective way. Never eat lunch at your desk Currently, most jobs involve desk work or sitting long hours in front of the computer, which is not good for health. This is because, sitting for long hours might increase the risk of various health problems such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes and obesity. Standing or actively moving, triggers biochemical processes in the body which helps in the breakdown of fats and sugars, thereby aiding in energy production. Hence if you have the habit of lunching at your desk, change it immediately. You can instead, have your meals at your office canteen. By doing so, the muscles in your body  are stimulated and bl...  

Australian Cinema Nears 30-Year Low

Australian cinema is facing a historically bad year after The Little Death joined a growing list of homemade films to tank at the box office. Josh Lawson’s directorial debut amassed just $77,700 in its opening three days, a less than lukewarm response to the TV star’s dark take on role playing in the bedroom. Aussie films are currently on track to record just a 2.3 percent share of the country’s box office totals, the second lowest figure since Screen Australia begun tallying the numbers back in 1977, according to News.com.au. The Railway Man (Nicole Kidman) , Wolf Creek 2 and Tracks are the only home-grown films to hit the $2 million mark in 2014, let down by poor efforts from Felony, The Rover and sci-fi thriller Predestination, starring Ethan Hawke. The Mule, a comedy starring Hugo Weaving, will also now bypass cinema release and is instead heading for digital release in November. Lawson’s successful transition from 2000’s television star into film has seen the 33-year-old land recent roles The Campaign (Will Ferrell and Zach Galifianakis) and Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues, but admits local interest in Australian film is suffering. “My greatest concern and my biggest challenge is to get Australians to watch the film,’’ Lawson said while promoting The Little Death in Sydney. “And that seems to be mission impossible. “It’s tough to get Australians to trust Australian films. I think they h...  

Alibaba leads global equity capital markets treasure hunt

LONDON/HONG KONG (Reuters) - Global equity capital markets returned with a vengeance in 2014 as bankers, investors and companies led a charge that culminated spectacularly in Alibaba, the biggest share listing ever. Worldwide equity capital market (ECM) deals, from flotations to rights issues, totalled $678.1 billion in the first nine months of 2014, a quarter more than the same period of 2013 and the highest since 2007, according to Thomson Reuters data.Companies around the world cashed in on strong investor demand and European deals jumped by more than half, hitting the highest level since records began in 1980.Initial public offerings (IPOs) in particular stole the limelight, almost doubling from the same period in 2013 to hit $176.1 billion worldwide.The long-awaited Alibaba flotation finally landed in September, whipping up a frenzy as everyone from founder Jack Ma to kung fu star Jet Li descended on the New York Stock Exchange to watch the e-commerce giant's stock rise 38 percent on its first day of trading. The listing raised $25 billion after underwriters sold extra shares, and helped stock market listings across the Asia Pacific region more than triple to $69.5 billion so far this year.Equity market deals were also buoyed by the resumption of listings in China after a hiatus of nearly a year and half, plus a surge in issuance in Hong Kong and Australia. The ECM rebound has proved lucrative, with bankers netting a juicy $300 million in fees for Alibaba alone. Goldman ...  

Silver screen lights back up at Petit Palais cinema in Pangrati

Silver screen lights back up at Petit Palais cinema in Pangrati By Dimitris Rigopoulos Is it possible that the announcement of a movie theater’s reopening can lift the morale of an entire neighborhood?As things stand in many urban neighborhoods around Greece, the opening or closure of a cinema, theater or even a simple business now has a much bigger impact than before the crisis. And when passers-by on Vassileos Georgiou and Rigillis streets saw the jolly message on the marquee of the Petit Palais cinema, with which the enterprise’s new management announced its relaunch, they felt a deep sense of relief. The truth is that the shutting down of a movie theater is always a sad loss, and even though Pangrati is much more fortunate than other parts of the Greek capital, both on a social and economic level, the closure of the Petit Palais, even if only for a year, hurt.What many Pangrati residents who fretted over the fate of the cinema did not know was that the business had many suitors, but it eventually went to George and Jimmy Stergiakis, two brothers best known as the managers of the Asty cinema in downtown Athens and the heads of the AMA Films distribution agency.“The Petit Palais has fallen into good hands,” George Stergiakis assures Kathimerini while explaining the brothers’ plans for the venue. “This is a cinema with a history, an identity and potential.&#...  

Car insurance industry wants to watch you drive

Car insurance industry wants to watch you drive THE growing usage of telematics in vehicle insurance raises questions about whether the data collected can be handed over to authorities to be used in criminal prosecutions, civil cases or traffic law enforcement. These are issues facing the industry globally, and the answers are not yet clear cut.Telematics uses wireless devices, or mobile phones, to transmit data from a vehicle in real time back to an organisation, such as an insurance company or tracker company, to monitor things such as location, speed, cornering and harsh braking."The crux of the matter is that it starts with what the consumer agrees to when they take out the insurance policy and agree to install the device, and this can differ from one insurer to the next," says Jonathan Holden, managing executive of insurance at Innovation Group, which provides business process outsourcing to the insurance, automotive and property industries.The insurer can set out what the data will be used for, including repudiating claims, and it is up to the consumer to agree or go elsewhere for cover, he says.At an SAP financial services conference in London earlier this month, insurers from around the world grappled with the wider implications of telematics, which is a useful tool for insurers to more accurately assess customer risk.The head of personal-lines insurance at Swiss Mobiliar, Patric Deflorin, told the conference that his company had run a number of pilot projects using ...  

I Went Swimming in the Arctic and Survived

I visited Svalbard, the chain of Norwegian islands some 600 miles from the North Pole. (Photo: Mona Gable) To say that I could not believe I was in the Arctic sounds trite. But as I hung perilously over the bow, one hand gripping my camera so it wouldn’t bang the rail, I was in awe. Below me, a steel wedge was breaking the ice as the National Geographic Explorer churned in the black Barents Sea. The wind was howling, and my cheeks stung from the cold. But for the first time in my life, I didn’t mind. Out there in the vast glimmering landscape of ice and mountains and snow were polar bears.    It was June, and I was on a Lindblad voyage in the Svalbard, a chain of Norwegian islands some 600 miles from the North Pole. The trip was full of adventure, the day before I’d pulled on my Muck Boots and trudged up a rocky slope, glaciers spreading far below. I’d seen a scraggly fox, tawny reindeer, and orange-beaked puffins. I’d also seen the rifles carried by our guides.I saw a lot of different animials, including the orange-beaked puffin. (Photo: Mona Gable) The rifles were required in case of a polar bear attack. “If you see a polar bear on land, it is not a photo opportunity,” joked Jason Kelley, one of our naturalists.  Related: Breaking the Ice: Crystal Cruises Will Sail the Once-Forbidden Arctic Svalbard, the archipelago of deep fjords we were exploring, is one of only two areas in the Arctic wh...  

Will the iPhone 6 Change the Way We Travel?

I wanted the iPhone 6 to change my life. (Photo: Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images) Rather than fantasizing about what it would be like to stretch out on an isolated stretch of beach or cruise away from it all across the Pacific Ocean, my travel fantasies tend toward the mundane. I dream about a phone that never dies, 4G service around the globe, a translator right in my headset, and GPS that will always give me perfect directions to a darling coffee shop anywhere in the world. Related: Screen Test—iPhone 6 vs. iPhone 6 Plus vs. Samsung Galaxy S5 I currently travel with both an iPhone 5 and an Android phone (the Samsung Galaxy 4S). Every time a new iteration of either of these phones is released, I hold out high hopes that my fantasies will become a reality.  Alas, the launch of the iPhone 6 last week hasn’t ended my dreaming, but there are a few ways in which the new phone will improve our travel. 1. Better photos    (Photo: Stephen Lam/Reuters/Corbis) The camera on the new iPhone is so improved that you could theoretically leave your DSLR camera at home and travel with just your new iPhone. The new camera on the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus is an 8MP iSight with True Tone flash that employs “Focus Pixels,” making autofocus more efficient, rendering colors more accurately, and creating higher-resolution panoramas. Professional shooters will also enjoy the option of manually manipulating the lens, mimicking a DSLR in many ways...  


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